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20131209
20131209
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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
at the end. asked what he i persuaded congrs to pass the four major legislatures involving civil rights. so on that count, which it achieved what johnson and chief? >> i don't think he ever would've had the kind of come the great society indeed and commitment that johnson had. because kennedy was essentially a foreign policy president. he used to say politics can ncj, but foreign policy can kill you. he would have gotten i think it would've run against barry goldwater, he would have won a big victory the way johnson it. he would have carried big majorities, democratic majorities into the house and senate i think. and i think he would've gotten the big tax cut, the federal aid to education, the medicare and the civil rights bills past. that would put them in the lead. the most, the rest of the 20th century presidential reformers, alongside of tr and wilson and even compared somewhat to fdr. i don't think he would have pushed beyond that. i think he would've pushed toward detente. i think we would have seen they don't earlier with kennedy family did with richard nixon, because that cuban miss
. it's all part of his enduring legacy. my guest, tom brokaw, civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson. and harry smith talks to poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> and that's what he brought, was deliverance and ignorance. >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa this week. nelson mandela will be laid to rest this week. charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 interviewing nelson mandela after he was released from prison. it's a great photo. the reverend jesse jackson is here, one of the
. >>> four u.s. presidents are headed to south africa to pay final respects to civil rights legend nelson mandela. president obama and first lady michelle obama departed on air force one just a short time ago. tomorrow's memorial service will also serve as a rare reunion for nearly all of the living american presidents. >>> kpix5cate courigan is in the news room. a real security challenge. >> reporter: 8000 mourners are expected to attend the memorial and authorities say thousands of police officers will be on hand. right now, a memorial outside of mandela's former home is growing as well as a crowd of south africa's that have come together since the death. >> police are preparing today for a memorial service for nelson mandela at a johannesburg soccer stadium. president obama leaves this morning for south africa where he'll attend the massive public memorial. former president's bush, clinton and carter will also be in attendance along with more than 50 heads of state, making it one of the largest gatherings of world leaders in recent history. >> this is a test for us. >> reporter: the he
was a protest against apartheid. >> and it's interesting, he being too young for the civil rights era, reverend jackson, but first to charles ogletree, this was the connection point was apartheid. this was the inspiration nelson mandela, who he could experience realtime, the joy of that deliverance realtime. >> that's exactly right. i was a student at stanford when i heard the movement about divestment from south africa in 1972. in 1971, barack obama was only ten years old so he was very young and never able to appreciate that. what i want to make clear, though, we shouldn't call him militant, we shouldn't call him a terrorist, he's a patriot. he's just like the patriots fighting here many, many centuries ago for equality. and that's what he was. he was a patriot who tried to make sure that his country where he was born, where he controlled would recognize the fact that the majority of people who were african were suppressed by the minority of people who were white, and that has to be changed. he is a patriot who did a great deal in his 27 years in prison and did a great deal as president and c
washington. >>> president obama is making a long trip from washington to south africa to honor civil rights legend nelson mandela. tomorrows memorial service will serve as a rare reunion of nearly all of the living american presidents. kpix5 is in the news room now and the number of dig any tar its i imagine is giving south african police quite a security challenge. >> reporter: yes, frank. more than 80,000 mourners are expected to attend the memorial and thousands of police officers will be on hand and right now a memorial outside nelson mandela's former home is growing as well as a crowd of south africans who have come together since his death. >> police are preparing today for a memorial service for nelson mandela at a soccer stadium tomorrow. president obama leaves this morning for south africa where he will attend the massive public memorial. former presidents bush, clinton and carter will also be in attendance along with more than 50 heads of state, making it one of the largest gatherings the world leaders in recent history. >> this is a test for us. >> the head of south africa's nati
of the people. and somehow the movement here, the civil rights movement in our country deserves much credit for the change we now see in america, and in south africa. >> well, and reverend, to that point, that's why it is so interesting -- i think, and potentially enlightening, to see some of the political debate playing out more among republicans. but take a listen to more from former speaker newt gingrich, in doing what rick hertzburg was doing, embracing as a founding father in politics, one of the best things you could say about someone. take a listen. >> posted my statement on her facebook page and was amazed at some of the intensity, some of whom came back three and four and five times, repeating how angry they were. so i wrote my newsletter on friday, basically entitled it, "what would you have done." >> and he goes on to talk about what the legacy of mandela is being a revolutionary and freedom fighter and also a patriot. how do you looking at this now, national/international conversation, how do you think we're doing in remembering our history accurately with apartheid as a foreign
sheriffs. it is part of an fbi investigation into allegations of civil rights abuses and corruption in the nation's largest jail system. fox 32 in chicago is covering the bears retiring coach mike ditka's number at halftime during monday night football tonight. the governor pat quinn's office also said he has declared it might ditka day. >>> and this is a live look at eden prairie, minnesota, from our fox affiliate there, kmsp. the big story there, extreme cold weather we told you about earlier and the damage it has caused in that region. that is a look outside of the beltway from special report. we'll be right back. >>> it is like deja vu all over again. time is coming up for a budget deal or risk another shutdown. >> with the senate just returning from thanksgiving recess and the house due to adjourn on friday, it is crunch time to get a budget deal. sources suggest the size of the agreement may be narrowing. mississippi republican roger wicker is a budget conferree. >> i'm thinking about the end of the week we'll have a deal that gets us some sequestration relief and we'll there
they needed to hear. he would come to the united states and with the u.s. civil rights movement then he brought it home. as a result now, south africa which still has troubles, still has 30% unemployment, which this rainbow nation doesn't exactly exist the way we like to think it does, is now left in -- with the absence of him to look in the hire current and future leaders realizing nobody quite measures up. partly because the goals were different. the ideals are different. the challenges are different. the economy is still struggling. will never see the likes of nelson mandela again. maybe neither should we. perhaps he was a man of his time. the question i guess now especially for all the young people, they call them born free, born after he was no longer president. he was one term as president which was another smart thing. >> one of the few african leaders who stepped down willingly. very few people in that position say, know what, i'm done. i'll move on to something else. >> schieffer: one of the few leaders, i mean you look where they sometimes have to take them out on a gurney kn
of the people of the country and the world. >> reporter: civil rights lawyer george bizos was mandela's attorney and friend. >> he was an example to the people of south africa, to the people of africa, to the people of the world as to how authorities is to be exercised. >> reporter: almost 60 heads of state including president barack obama and most of the living former u.s. presidents will attend mandela's memorial and funeral services this week. from a massive ceremony at a johannesburg stadium tuesday to lying in state in the capitol pretoria to burial next sunday in his ancestral village in the eastern cape province, it's expected to be one of the largest global gatherings in recent history. >> reporter: you say 11,000 troops? >> 11,000 troops have been deployed. >> reporter: defense minister nosiviwe mapisa-nqakula is overseeing security. she says soldier, the air force, national and city police all are being deployed to control and protect tens of thousands of mourners. >> this is a test for us. and we know that and believe that people will be watching how south africa perform. >> today a s
and the civil rights movement in the united states had many things in common. they did they actually today it's just a day of different sets of circumstances in the united states african americans why in the monarchy. anso it was a fraction of the population up saying that we wanted to acquire rights just as everyone else was in south africa eu yet the majority of black south africans who were old friends i mean argue whites so they aware there were some differences but there were some similarities in terms of segregation are and and and so all of those of the areas that had to be broken now. so while they are some similarities. the b two different types of movements ultimately getting rid of apartheid. in in a sense certainly is this the same is getting or use some left their similarities to getting rid of racism up the room throughout our world. o'neill is the fact that both him and ella had so much empathy mimi was ready to understand and appreciate the fifth of what some africans had evened out a piece way when we look at what he did in the sport's the renamed he rants and champion the ga
to civil rights legend nelson mandela. yesterday was a national day of prayer for the activist who died thursday at the age of 95. at one ceremony mandela was remembered by the man who succeeded him as south africa's president. >> what inspired by what he and his generation were able to do, for millions of our people, to engage in struggle, to end in justice. >> president obama and first lady michelle obama will attend a public memorial service for mandela tomorrow. former president jimmy carter, bill clinton and george w. bush also plan to attend with their wives. then mandela's body will lie in state for three days before his burial. >> mr. mandela is also being remembered in the bay area. kpix5 shows us the celebration of mandela's life and legacy at a bay area church. >> reporter: when san francisco's glide memorial church remembered nelson mandela at their morning services the only thing missing was sadness. the mood was joyful as a children's choir honored the passing of the man being called the father of a nation. >> it's bigger than that. i mean, nelson mandela touched all of ou
the respect he had for judge pryor, i knew mr. pickering who had really been a pioneer for civil rights in the state of mississippi in the 1960's and 1970's when it was hard to be. the truth was the majority of democrats said, we're going t to -- we're going to block 10 of the bush judges. never been done before, but we're going to do it with a cloture vote. well, madam president, as you can guess, everyone on the republican side in the majority then got very excited. and the majority leader, senator frist, said, we're going to change the rules, do something that senator lott, a majority leader once said, was the nuclear option. and there was great consternation. senator reid said -- he recounts this very well in his book -- in 2006, he said, to do so would be the end of the senate. i made two speeches, madam president. i suggested, well, this is a terrible thing to do. a president ought to have an up-or-down vote on his circuit judges. so why don't we see if we can't get a few republicans and a few democrats and just take it out of the hands of the leaders and agree that we'll only use
inspiration from him during the civil rights days here in america, and they prayed for him and gave him their support all those years when he was in prison. and, of course, it was a big event here when only a few months after he got out of prison, he came to visit this church. it does beg the question how you memorialize this man in just one sermon. we spoke earlier to senior pastor j. edgar boyd? >> i he dismantled with the prison cell with the help of those here in america and other parts of the world, the giant, the you know grateful and the wronged giant of apartheid. he disassembled it and brought about hope, and it brought about liberation not only for himself but for peace-loving people throughout south africa. >> new mexico new mexico had been out of the public eye for many years before he died but there are parishioners here who met him and we spoke to one of them? >> what a blissing it meet in gentleman, more than anything in life, the one who told us to forgive. the hardest thing to do in life is to forgive. he told us to forgive. no forgive and move on. yes, et cetera my her
of nelson mandela. >> the civil rights icon has 17 grandchildren, some of whom opened up in a rare interview with abc's rina ninan. >> reporter: set free after 27 years in prison. >> first steps into a new south africa. >> reporter: some of his grandchildren found themselves longing for his prison days. >> those days i cherished because it was just the two of no one else. when he came out we did not have him because he had bigger issues to tackle. >> reporter: his grandson remembers visiting him when he was 4. >> he asked the wardens if he could put cartoons on the tv so me and my other cousins could sit and watch them and he offered us hot chocolate and he made it himself. >> reporter: his granddaughter said that while he couldn't physically touch them, his words always did. >> at the end of the visit he brought me a box of chocolates saying your visit will always be a bittersweet memory for me. >> reporter: words in the form of letters written to the family from jail. this one describing the moment that he was told his son was killed in a car accident. >> it describes his heart seems to st
, they weren't violating people's civil rights or privacy and it was a program carefully monitored and it is unfortunate the only person we have now to defend it is the president but nobody trusts him. he didn't know about the irs. >> do you believe that? >> i find it hard to believe. >> which is worse that he didn't know or he did know and he lied? >> i think the latter. i think -- i don't know how many times s you can say i didn't know about that. the president of the united states, on issues that big, on benghazi for example and the irs scandal, i think those are things that if he doesn't know about he has an incompetent staff or given instructions he doesn't want to know. but the idea he didn't know about what was going on strikes me as just not credible. >> all right. i'll have more of our special chat with former vice president dick cheney tonight at 8:00 p.m. you might be surprise who is impressing him in the early presidential sweepstakes. it is not necessarily a certain governor in the state of new jersey. who is and who isn't, his struggle right now, his daughters are fig
's deputies face federal charges in a civil rights and corruption case. the announcement today alleged beatings of inmates and jail visitors, unjustified detentions and conspiracy to obstruct a federal investigation. the probe focuses on the county jail system, the nation's largest. princeton university began immunizing nearly 6,000 students today against "type b" meningitis. the outbreak was deemed so serious that the food and drug administration authorized use of a vaccine not licensed in the u.s. since march, eight people at princeton have been stricken by the potentially fatal disease. it's spread through kissing, coughing and other contact. the federal bailout of general motors is officially over. the treasury sold its remaining shares in the automaker today. in the end, the net cost to taxpayers was $10.5 billion. and on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average gained five points to close at 16,025. the nasdaq rose six points to close at 4,068. >> ifill: still to come on the "newshour": tech giants call for limits on spying; disarming rebels in the central african repu
. it started with jesse helms. i rest my case. >> and strom thurmond. >> because after the civil rights act of 1964 was passed, they were very irate that the democratic party was becoming inclusive in all kinds of ways, especially racial. they started to -- 8000 fundamentalist baptist churches -- they took over the republican party levers of power gradually, so now you cannot get through the primaries to get into the general election as a smart, centrist conservative whatever, a perfectly sensible person. it is so dangerous to have one of our two parties controlled by extremists. of course, we get mad at the democrats. i am mad at the democrats every minute. then you find yourself voting for this other party. here's my plan. my plan is that we do what the right-wing democrats did and we go to the local caucuses and so on. even i am willing to look republican. i will take off this belt. [laughter] [applause] >> do you like my jacket? >> yes. we will infiltrate the caucuses. that is what they did. we will take them over. in four years, you will have a chaotic and terrible republican conventio
colleague nbc news special correspondent tom brokaw, civil rights leader, the reverend jesse jackson and nbc news correspondent harry smith talks to author and poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> that's what he's brought, deliverance from ignorance. >> i'm david gregory. all of that ahead on "meet the press" from new york this morning, sunday, december 8th. . >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa this week. nelson mandela will be laid to rest this week. charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 inter
of politicians, celebrities, civil rights leaders and others who are arriving in south africa to pay their respects to nelson mandela but only a select few got to hitch a ride with the president, including one guy who sat in that big chair before. the ex-presidents club has been called the most exclusive one in the world and they have been depicted as a super group of super heroes by "snl" but what happens in reality when you're stuck on a 19 hour flight with someone who has spent years repudiating everything you stand for? well, actually, it can mean beautiful things. the world is quickly preparing for what may be the largest gathering of heads of state since winston churchill's funeral in 1965. representing the u.s. alone will be presidents barack obama, george w. bush, bill clinton and jimmy carter. comprising one of the most prestigious frequent flyer clubs in the world. today, air force one departed for south africa, where more than 90 world leaders are planning to attend nelson mandela's memorial tuesday in johannesburg. inside air force one, the obamas and george w. and laura
a pivotal moment in civil rights history that happened on this day 60 years ago. the landmark brown versus the board of education decision of 1954 declared that separate public schools for black and white students were unconstitutional. an important part of that decision was the one that applied to washington, d.c. and six decades ago today two lawyers argued the washington, d.c. portion of the case. their argument, school segregation was a violation of liberty. the decision would have a direct impact on the first high school in the country, dunbar high school in washington, d.c. opened in 1870 and despite being segregated, it developed ground breaker after ground breaker. including george hayes. one of the lawyers who argued the case. and charles hamilton houston, the lawyer known as the man who killed jim crow. this year a great book chronicles the school in "first class: the legacy of dunbar, america's first black public high school." joining me now is the author allison stewart. allison, thanks for being here. >> i am thrilled to be here. >> let's start 60 years ago today. they argued
know, i was part of the civil rights movement in the south. he said oh, do you know maya angelou? she meant so much to me, reading her in prison. you were in his heart and mind all those years. >> he told charlene gault that people had been slipping my books into him all the years. i spoke with one journalist who said, can you imagine being in the hell hole of a south african prison reading the caged bird. >> this means so much to us. i know you've been through a lot in the last days. we just want to say thank you for recollections, thank you for your poetry, and thank you for being with us today. >> thank you miss mitchell. i admire. i watch you with great gratitude and appreciation. >> that is an enormous honor. >> that you very much for your own gentleness. you report on some hellish situations around the world but i never hear the hell in your voice. thank you. >> thank you for that. very much so. >> thank you. >> good-bye to you. coming up next, nelson mandela's leadership, his legacy. but first "nbc nightly news" anchor brian williams sat down in south africa with former preside
family has filed a federal civil rights lawsuit. this as the police department continues to investigate exactly what happened. its findings will be turned over to the district attorney and the district attorney will decide whether a crime was committed. alex savidge, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> later today, the senate is expected to vote on whether to renew a ban on plastic guns that can evade metal detectors. the 25-year-old ban is due to expire at midnight. today's vote is on extending the ban for ten more years. last week, the house voted to approve the extension. >>> the main library is increasing security after a string of problems after a recent attack. in september, a 61-year-old man was hit in the head by a chair while using a library computer. there have been complaints about bathroom conditions, people using drugs and found sleeping in the library. in response, the library plans to higher more security guards and cuss toldian and increase -- custodians and increase the hours of the part-time employee. >>> state and local lawmakers are scheduled to attend a conference today on the
think that it's a violation of the law. we have to balance our security with a respect for civil rights and our constitution, which has made america different. and what the nsa has done with the administration's concurrence simply does the security route and forgets about the civil liberties and constitutional laws. heather: you put together this freedom act that you see you say is different. how is that? >> it restricts who the nsa can collect information from, specifically the bull collection of records by the nsa. it's as simple as that. heather: you are also calling for civilians to be in charge. what difference do you think that will make? >> the military does a good job, but their job is to protect the security of the united states and forget about the constitutional concerns and i think that having someone without a military background as well as being a national director of intelligence, that would bring the proper balance in determining what to ask the court to approve and how to go about collecting this information. and i can say thoroughly that we do need to have a properly a
to compound. so the two things i end up by saying, i'm reminded of something the civil rights leader when he said we may have arrived on these shores in different ships, but we're all in the same boat now. what's going on in this town is that too often, the two political parties, you think they're from different countries. they view the other side as the enemy, not the fell blow citizens with whom they occasionally disagree. but in the long run, they have the sate fate, interests in common. we have to reconcile our differences, not accentuate them. but we forget we come from a common country and common heritage and for sure a common destiny. final thing i say, this is something that no labels is working to overcome. in this city today, what all of you have to do every section is forge principle compromise, the word compromise, back in the dale, my father's time, that was an act of statesmanship. today it's a act of betrayal. if you don't work with your party 100% of the time, you're ostracized, there's something wrong with you. you can see this on cable tv and a variety of other things. i'll
include allegations that employees of the department deprived jail prisoners of civil rights, also obstruction of justice allegations. apparent attempts to cover up the truth after it became clear that cases were under investigation. some of the most outlandish alleged behavior started after it became known that an informant in the jail was working with the fbi. the u.s. attorney's office said employees of the sheriff's department went so far as to try to get a judge to release names of everybody involved in the investigation and when that didn't work, allegedly tried to put the squeeze on an fbi agent. >> despite a judge's refusal to issue this order because he had no jurisdiction over the federal agency, two los angeles county sheriff's deputies, sergeants, allegedly confronted an fbi special agent outside her residence in an attempt to intimidate her into providing details about the investigation. >> reporter: now, in the past, sheriff lee bacca has said it was the fbi who was breaking the law and said there was really no attempt to intimidate the fbi agent. it doesn't really so
people wanted justice, and especially coming out at the end of the civil rights movement, a lot of people in the united states were thinking where do i put my energy now. the idea and the images that were coming out of south africa with rewards to the apartheid movement really ignited their imagination and the passion for justice. >> can't wait to see the film. >> thank you. >> thank you for being with us. the film is the 12 disciples of nelson mandela. it is about the people who were behind the scenes of the movement. here's what we can expect next in south africa. nelson mandela will be laid to rest during the official state funeral taking place in a 10 day period. tomorrow begins the memorial service, open to the public. the government are he can specking 80,000 people to be in attendance there. from wednesday to friday, international visitors will view mandelle la's remains. his body will be taken to the eastern cape where the ruling party will then pay their final respects. sunday, december 15 will bring the 10 day funeral to an end. dignitaries scheduled to attend, 71 expected to be
up icing, i'm reminded of something the civil rights leader said when he said, we may have arrived on these shores in different ships, but we're all in the same boat now. what's going on in this town is that too often, the two political parties, you would think they were from different countries. they view the other side as the enemy, not as foul citizens. we have interests in common. we've got to reconcile our differences, not accentuate them. we forget we come from a common country with a common heritage, and for sure a common destiny. final thing i would say, and this is something that no labels is working to overcome, in this city today what all of you have to do every session in your state legislatures, forge principle compromised. the word cover my switchback in the day my father son used to be viewed as that's an act of statesmanship. today it is used as an act of betrayal. if you don't vote with your party, joe manchin was saying, 100% of the time, you are ostracized. there's something wrong with you. you can see this on cable tv. so i'll just finish by recounting some word
-- >> and credit. >> right. >> looking at some of the figures who were known to people as established players, when the revolution finished as well as when the civil war was completed, george washington, for example, 1775, seemed to be somewhat of an out lie -- out-ly 'er. >> when i came up with the book, my concern was, washington, the walking marble man, and what us he going to really be a buzz kill once he arrives on the scene after the battle of bunker hill. anything but. i mean, it's just fascinating to see washington. a man from virginia, arriving in new england. a couple weeks after the battle of bunker hill -- and this is a new england army. these are people whose idea of diversity is, okay, i'm from massachusetts but i'm willing to serve in an army with someone from new hampshire. and then to have this plantation owner arrive, and he realizes, this is an army that, because they have grown up with the new england town meeting -- which is a wonderful form of government in which basically people argue until finally they come to a decision. the soldiers in this army, when given an order, would
in this way. >> i follow on exactly from the comments of the right honorable member and her reminiscence but also her mild remonstrance, which is absolutely well made, that we are talking here about a politician. certainly in the civil encounters with president mandela in one capacity, and with mr. mandela post-presidency in other capacities, not only was his sense of humor telling, but so was the self-deprecating use to which he put that humour, lest there was any thought that a political halo could be bestowed upon him. he certainly did not want that, and he would not want that to be part of his legacy today. i mention humor because my first introduction to nelson mandela was far from fortuitous. he was then president, and enormous numbers of parliamentarians had somehow all descended on south africa at the same time. they had come from new zealand, australia, here, ireland, france all on fact-finding missions. it was interesting that these fact-finding missions all coincided with the rugby world cup that was taking place in south africa. given that there were more visiting foreign pol
to describe what's going on. because that's part of the problem. so i don't see it as a civil war. i see it as -- i see it as what happens when a party is out of power, and there isn't one unifying voice. if i ask you guys right now, you are knitting over there, who is the leader of the republican party today? [inaudible] >> he's my friend. i would tell him he got one person in new hampshire. [inaudible] >> who do you think is the leader of the party? >> it isn't jon boehner. he has no control over the pulpit or even in the senate look at ted cruz. ted cruz wouldn't say mitch mcconnell is the leader by any means. i think it's just so loose and -- i would like to process a chris christie. >> that's the point. if i went around the sherman act and as everybody who the leader of the republican party is, either we get no answers or 40 different answers. so when you don't have somebody that sets the standard, sets the tone, this happened. people start talking. you start sounding a little dysfunctional like you're suffering from multiple -- multiple personality disorder. that is happening to re
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)